On Astrology

You either love it or hate it–or maybe you’re somewhere in between, but chances are you’ve at least picked up on the rampant astrology trend that seems to have swept through millennial culture with a vengeance, conjuring nostalgic reminiscences of the 60’s and 70’s new age (of Aquarius!) for baby boomers, and leaving the blip of the 90’s Wicca surge comparably in the dust. These articles explore this starry craze…

This article from [The Atlantic] – The New Age of Astrology – explores why millennials are so obsessed, dappling into how the “combination of stress and uncertainty about the future is an ailment for which astrology can seem like the perfect balm”. And from the [New York Times]How Astrology Took Over the Internet – discusses the Internet’s role in this remarkable trend.

But it’s not just online and on phones, Astrology has taken over the book world too! This funny article talks about each sign’s relationship with books in general. And here, you can see which famous authors share your sign.

Curious about what your sign should read? Of course you are! Check out your 2019 Literary Horoscope, to see what books await your future. [Lit Hub] has a monthly Astrology Book Club — full of suggestions for what each sign should read each month, and so does the [New York Public Library].

There’s also plenty of books to brush up on your astrology. Here’s a few we typically carry:

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If you’re still an unbeliever, check out this article from [Lit Hub] called Who Needs Astrology? (Maybe you do!)

 

 

 

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Links we Love: March

What a fun, weird project: How does Margaret Atwood draw a bunny? [NYTimes]

This is my kind of TV: The 50 Greatest Literary TV Adaptations Ever, Ranked. [LitHub]


I love this: After Regina King won the best supporting actress Oscar, James Baldwin became the top trending search on Google. [NBC News via LitHub]

Little Free Libraries

Called “the worlds largest book-sharing movement”, Little Free Libraries are a rising literary trend, and are popping up in neighborhoods everywhere. Looking like an odd birdhouse or an overlarge mailbox, the concept is simple: stick a wooden box on a post, and fill that box with books. The “Take a book, leave a book” mentality tells perusers that they can borrow a book, but should be prepared to leave one in its stead.

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“I love the quirkiness of what is in the Little Free Library at any given time,” says Andrea Griffith, Little Free Library Steward and owner of Browsers Bookshop. “The books can change quickly and it is just fun to see the library build community.”

You can read more about the Thurston County little free libraries over here.

Or check out the official Little Free Library website.

Want to get in on the trend? Here’s a great guide for building your own, accompanied with a 30-second video!

 

 

 

 

 

Links We Love – February

For those of you struggling to finish Milkman (ahem, that includes me), our book club selection this month: On Why We Need Difficult Books. [The Guardian via bookseller Elise]


This man has collected 10,000 books and his StoryCorps interview (2.5 min) with his daughter is worth a listen. [NPR]

We finally got this back in stock: The Story Behind P is For Pterodactyl, The Self-Described ‘Worst Alphabet Book Ever.’
[NYTimes]

My Heart

My heart is a window. My heart is a slide. My heart can be closed…or opened up wide.

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We are so thrilled to be selling Corinna Luyken’s gorgeous new picture book, My Heart. A deceptively simple yet profound poem with beautiful original illustrations, My Heart is about caring for your own heart and living with kindness and empathy. Some days your heart is a puddle or a fence to keep the world out. But some days it is wide open to the love that surrounds you. With lyrical text and breathtaking art, My Heart empowers all readers to listen to the guide within in this ode to love and self-acceptance.

We were absolutely delighted to find this 6th grader’s incredibly charming and accurate book report on Corinna Luyken’s book.  Check out the video below.

Best of 2018

The year’s wrapping up so we’ve gone around and found the “Best of 2018” in the magical realm of books!

Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/29/books/review/best-books.html

NPR’s got a wonderful list of Best Books of 2018.

Literary Review brings us 2018’s Worst Sex scenes in fiction!

Open Letters Review shows us the Worst Books of 2018. I’m not sure I agree with some of these…Especially since some which show up on this list also show up on Lit Hub’s Ultimate Best Books of 2018

 

Ghost Stories for Christmas

Yule! Winter Solstice! Christmas! Hanukkah! ‘Tis the season of holidays and festivals! Of long nights and of twinkling lights to keep the dark away. The days grow short and the night grows long and in this dark season, it’s time to call back an old tradition–of telling ghost stories at Christmas.

Smithsonian discusses the traditions of this season. They’re about darker, older, more fundamental things: winter, death, rebirth, and the rapt connection between a teller and his or her audience”. Smithsonian explores in depth the English tradition of telling ghost stories.

Paris Review gives a list of 5 Forgotten Christmas Ghost Stories, while the Line up gives us another 4 Eerie Old Holiday Ghost Stories.

Come by the store and pick up a handful of bite-sized Victorian Ghost Stories! I give one of these to my family every Christmas and we all gather around the fire to listen as one of us reads it aloud.

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